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Owl Bonanza in the Norwegian lowlands, March-2017.

A certain species of owls has been one of the photo targets this winter. A couple of Short-eared Owls have found their perfect spot on earth for the last month. It has been a very interesting time to follow these clever rodent hunters. Contrary to most other owls they are not nocturnal, but search for prey at daytime. When spring now is emerging in the lowlands they will soon slowly head out against the higher marshes and arctic tundra to finally arrive their nesting places in May and June. In the mean time they feed themselves up here in the mild part of Norway close to the North Sea.

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The Short-Eared Owl sitting on top of a grassy slope.

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Patrolling the coast line.

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A fantastic eye sight combined with extremely fine hearing make them specialists in catching rodents.

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Whoooom, -and another mouse is soon in the sharp owl claws.

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It can look a bit peculiar when the hungry owl suddenly decide to dive down to the ground for grabbing prey.

For more new photos of these owls, please see the Short-eared Owl Gallery.

 

 

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AUTUMN IN THE SOUTH NORWEGIAN MOUNTAINS, -primo October-2016.

Autumn is the traditional time for time for hunting and gathering. Spending time in the mountains at this time when the temperature have dropped and you feel the sharp & fresh air in the face is wonderful. Coming back after spending some time there I want to show a couple of images from the trip:

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A week into October month the rutting time is over for the Reindeer, and they continue the annual migration pattern.

 

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For more images of Reindeer, please see the Reindeer gallery.

 

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Sunrise in the Rondane mountain range.

 

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The Ptarmigans congregate and change from summer to winter plumage.

 

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The Redpolls also congregate and prepare for winter, -they do not stay in the cold parts of Norway as the Reindeer and  Ptarmigans, but prefer to move further south.

 

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Birch catkins is common food for the Redpolls.

 

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There are many Hawk Owls to see in southern Norway this autumn, this due to lack of rodents in the adjacent land areas.

 

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The Hawk Owls are also to be found in the lowland, as this owl. For more images of Hawk Owls, please see the Hawk Owl gallery.

 

 

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Some recent images from southern Norway in Spring and early Summer of 2016.

 

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The female Peregrine Falcon lands on its favorite cliff at the coastal nesting place. More images of this falcon are to be found in the “Peregrine Falcon” gallery.

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The Kestrel couple looking down on the human intruder entering their territory in the mountains.. The male on the left side, and the female to the right. See the “Kestrel” gallery for more images.

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Female Gyr Falcon with prey heading for the nest in a cliff well above the treeline. Very good to see that despite low numbers of Ptarmigans also this year the falcons manage to rise young ones. See the “Gyr Falcon” gallery for more new images of this species.

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Beautiful and mystic Arctic Loons gathering at sunrise in a remote lake.

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Female Arctic Loon, -the male in behind. For more images of these magnificent birds, please see the “Loons” gallery.

 

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Winter images from the Nordic countries.

A couple of shots from the winter 2015/16 photo sessions:

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The beautiful male Hen Harrier in south western Norway. See the “Hen Harrier” gallery for more images.

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Female Goshawk in south western Norway. For more images, please see the “Goshawk” gallery.

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Male Velvet Scoters in Hafrsfjord, Norway. More Velvet Scoters are to be found in the “Ducks” gallery.

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Lone Grey Wolf in eastern Finland. See the “Wolf” gallery for more images.

 

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Reindeer in the south Norwegian mountains, October 2015.

For the part of the Norwegian population that live in small villages and farms at higher altitudes autumn is synonymous with hunting and gathering. Regarding hunting mainly reindeer, -as it has been since time immemorial, -hundreds, -yes thousands of years back in time. This hunt still continues, some using rifles and some cameras. Below here are some examples from the camera hunt in the south Norwegian high mountains.

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Bulls in the last hour of the day`s light. It is fascinating to to think that these proud and beautiful animals have lived in the Norwegian mountains since the last Ice Age, and that they are the last population left of a species that once roamed all over Europe.

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The guard of the Reindeer herd. Please see the “Reindeer” gallery for more new images of Reindeer.

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The rutting season is still ongoing. Two bulls that are not quite sure if it is worth another fight, -they have both been in hard battles earlier today.

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Ancient Reindeer pitfall trap in perfect condition, see the “Archaeological Sites” gallery for more images, -and what this specific trap contained… Here from the Rondane mountain range.

 

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Recent photographs from Norway, Summer-2015.

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Good to see that the local Peregrine Falcons found back to their traditional nesting place also this year. This is the adult female. Please see the “Peregrine Falcon” gallery for more images of his beautiful bird.

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…and so did the majestic Gyr Falcons. Despite low numbers of rodents and Ptarmigans in the south Norwegian mountains the local couple managed to get two juveniles on wings. See the “Gyr Falcon” gallery for more images.

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Adult Eagle Owl at their coastal territory. See the “Eagle Owl” gallery for more images of this mystic bird.

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Due to unusual late Summer with quite many mountain lakes and ponds still ice covered / partly ice covered in the middle of July, many ducks (as the Common Scoters on the photo) had still not started nesting yet.

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It is always interesting to stop for a look at places where ancient history can be found. This is an approximately 2000 years old Reindeer trap in the Rondane mountain range, and is placed at a traditional Reindeer path (this path is even used by the Reindeer today). The Reindeer was first scared by ancient hunters in the direction of the trap. Lead-fences and markers of stone closer to the trap made the Reindeer thereafter running exactly against the trap opening (the short end were the person on the photo stand). When they rushed past the small rock formation in the foreground they jumped straight down into he trap (the trap could not be seen by the running Reindeer before it was to late), and were not able to exit the trap due to high walls (up to 1,8m). See more images from this site on the “Archaeological Sites” gallery.

 

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Norwegian spring, April-2015.

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Adult Golden Eagle patrolling its territory high up in the snow covered mountains. See the “Golden Eagle” gallery for more images.

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Adult male Red Fox in search for food to the female that is in the den with their cubs.

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Any rodents to catch ?

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The foxes territory is hilly with lakes and steep valleys. The “Red Fox” gallery contains more photos of this interesting animal.

 

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Raptors and Owls in the south Norwegian winter, March-2015.

Some photographs showing the latest captions of these beautiful birds:

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Male Hen Harrier.

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Male Hen Harrier. For more new images of this species, please see the “Hen Harrier” gallery.

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Adult female Goshawk. See the “Goshawk” Gallery for more new images of this terrific bird.

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Long-eared-Owl.

 

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Images from Summer – Autumn in Norway-2014.

I`ll here show a couple of images from two of the photographic trips in norway this Summer and Autumn. First by the seaside at Helgelandskysten, close to the Arctic Circle. Thereafter from the latest trip to the mountains in southern Norway.

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Part from the archipelago at Helgelandskysten. Bands with Calcite Marble characterizes this area.

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Puffin.

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Europe`s densest population of Eagle Owls are found on this Archipelago. The territory sizes can here be as small as one square km. Main prey for them are not sea birds, but voles. See the “Eagle Owl” gallery for more images of the worlds biggest Owl.

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In great parts of the mountains in southern Norway there are huge poplations of Lemmings this year. This is from the Hardangervidda mountain plateau.

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Rough Legged Buzzards feed on Lemmings, and are to be found in great numbers when the Lemming population are at peak (as this year). See the “Rough-legged Buzzard” gallery for more images.

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Man has hunted Reindeer in the Norwegian mountains for thousands of years. This is a pitfall trap from the Viking Age where we still can see remnants of the fences that lead the Reindeer in the direction where the pitfall trap was. The pitfall had a crate of thin branches on top and was covered with moss and heather as the surrounding vegetation. The grazing or migrating Reindeer did not see the pitfall before it was too late and they had fallen down into it. Here from Hardangervidda mountain plateau. See the “Archaeological Sites” gallery for more images from the ancient Reindeer Hunters period.

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Medieval dwelling ruin on Hardangervidda mountain plateau.

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Part from the south Norwegian mountains. This move block shows that the land here once was glacier covered. Now we only see minor remnants here and there of the ice age that by definition ended 9000 thousand years ago.

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…and the first inhabitants that arrived after the ice age was the Reindeer. They actually followed the retracting ice cap.

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Here in southern Norway it is the only place in Europe where we still can find wild Reindeeer. Animals that 20-30.000 yers ago once roamed all over Europe. It is therefor extremely important that they are taken good care of. See the “Reindeer” gallery for more images of these amazing animals.

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A journey to the archipelago of Svalbard, June 23rd to July 05th-2014.

After a couple of weeks in the Norwegian high arctic archipelago of Svalbard I want to share some moments with you below here. On behalf of Arctic Images I have been up there at this fabulous place numerous of times, and never ever been disappointed what the land can show up, -so with this trip.

The original plan was to bring the ship north along the west coast before heading eastwards. From there, -weather, ice and the spirits would decide where to go. But it did not become like this, heavy ice from the north pole basin has for weeks effectively prevented ships for sailing the north coast. Instead we went south along the west coast, rounded Sørkapp and up again in the big fjord of Storfjorden. Our area of activity stretched from this area to 80 degrees north in Hinlopenstredet that divides Spitsbergen from Nordaustlandet. In periods there was no ice, and other periods there was heavy pack ice also there. I was very pleased taking this route on the “back side” of Svalbard due to that this land is far less visited by man than the north west and northern coastal areas.

The weather was generally calm with little or no wind, but blue sky was as often up here in the northern Barents Sea area covered by low clouds.

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Polar Bear mother and cub on the sea ice near Hinlopenstredet. The midnight sun shines through the fog against Hochstetterbreen in the behind.

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This Polar Bear cub by Inglefieldbreen seems to be a bit wary of the visitors…

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Whatching… For more new Polar Bear images, please see the “Polar Bear” gallery.

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Brunnich Guillemots on a piece of glacier ice in the Hinlopenstredet.

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Black Guillemots in Palanderbukta, Nordaustlandet.

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Svalbards mosts spectacular bird cliff is Alkefjellet in Hinlopenstredet. Approximately 90.000 Brunnich Guillemots nests on these basaltic cliffs.

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Fulmar in front of Isbukta, Spitsbergen. The mountain peak Haitanna (“The Shark Tooth”) behind.

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Curious Walrus in Palanderbukta, Nordaustlandet.

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Walrus on drifting ice in Hinlopenstredet.

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Walrus from the haul-out place at Isbukta, Spitsbergen.

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Walrus photographer Ole-Jørgen at Andretangen, Edgeøya. For more new images of Walrus, please see the “Walrus” gallery.

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Arctic Foxes are abundant all over Svalbard. This belong to a family group of foxes sited close to a bird cliff north of Diskobukta, Nordaustlandet.

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Reindeer bull at Bellsund. The land below Ingeborgfjellet bird cliff is heavily fertilized by bird droppings and is one of the best grazing grounds for Reindeer on Svalbard.

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A really exclusive species found on an island in Storfjorden. Three pairs of Sabine`s Gulls was nesting there. This is the second “biggest colony” of these birds on Svalbard. The total poulation Sabine`s Gulls are estimated to be around 20 pairs at the archipelago.

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The Sabine`s Gulls have a special ritual when saying hello to each other. For more new images of the Sabine`s Gulls, please see the “Gulls” gallery.

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The high arctic King Eiders making new family… For more images of King Eiders, please see the “Ducks” gallery.

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Old trappers station on Edgeøya (Diskobukta) named “Villa Disko”. There are many of these stations at Svalbard from the time when man hunted Polar Bears and Arctic Foxes for their fur. This specific station was built by oldtimer Georg Bjønnes in 1929. A few of the old trappers stations are still in good condition, but the majority of them are in decay or as ruins. The fur hunting epoch at Svalbard is an important part of its history, and it is sad to see the stations in increasingly poor conditions.

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Remnants from a bygone era. Old trap to kill Arctic Foxes. These special traps are typical for Norwegian trappers at both Svalbard and North East Greenland. The stones beside the trap was loaded on top of the trap (wooden frame) that was raised approximately 30 degrees above ground level and held up by a special wooden locking mechanism. A bait (often a ptarmigans head) was attached to this mechanism. When the fox snatch the bait, -the wooden fram with the stones on top will fall over and kill the animal. For more images from the fur trappers period, please see the “Fur Trapping” gallery.

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This trappers station at Andretangen on Edgeøya was in earlier days one of Svalbards most important stations for Polar Bear hunting. The legendary trapper Henry Rudi built this station in 1946 and lived here for long periods. Last time I was here, the boat in the foreground still had a boats shape, but as we see the degradation is now at full swing. It does not show in the picture, -but the station itself is also in decay (roof collapsing due to rotting materials).

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Bowhead Whale bone (Greenland Whale) at Diskobukta, Edgeøya. For more landscape images, please see the “Landscape” gallery.

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Sleeping Red-Phalarope in Adventdalen.

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Barnacle Geese have increased in numbers on Svalbard. Note the Red-Phalarope.

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White-beaked Dolphins are frequently seen west and south of Svalbard during summer time. These are photographed west of Bellsund when we returned back to Longyearbyen at the end of the journey.

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The Peregrine Falcons arrive to their territory, May 01st-2014.
A visit to one of my favorite areas in coastal western Norway shows that the Peregrine Falcons are back to their territory again. It is always nice to see these birds, especially when we know that they for only 3-4 decades ago was near extinction in Norway. In mid seventies only 6 pairs nested in the country. Now the population counts hundreds of pairs. Let us take good care of these gorgeous birds !
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The adult male Peregrine. See the “Peregrine Falcon” Gallery for more images.

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This actual Peregrine territory is quite a bit out at sea from the mainland, where the weather is too harsh for trees to grow.

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Winter raptors in the Norwegian lowlands, March-2014.
Each winter several bird of prey species are found wintering by the coast of south western Norway where we live. Due to a relative mild climate and good access to prey some of them stay in the area all winter. Great for birding and photographing !
Below here I show some example images of these magnificent hunters taken this winter.

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Most all wintering Goshawks here this season was adult birds, -which indicate low reproduction success in 2013.

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The Goshawks short and wide wings together wits its long tail make this powerful raptor to an agile hunter. See the “Goshawk” gallery for more images.

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The numbers of wintering Rough-legged Buzzards can briefly reflect last summers vole population. Only a few Rough-legged Buzzards was observed in the wintering area and that means averagely low density nesting birds on the Scandinavian Peninsula.

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Rough-legged Buzzard. See the “Rough-legged Buzzard” gallery for more images.

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Female colored Hen Harrier. These beautiful birds most characteristic look is the owl-facial appearance.

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The Hen Harriers are specialists in catching voles, frogs etc. and can search in hours for them flying only a few meters over the ground. See the “Hen Harrier” gallery for more images.

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Autumn in the Norwegian mountains, October-2013.
Autumn again ! Nothing is as fresh and beautiful as a clear sub-zero autumn morning in the mountains. Then we really feel we are living beings originated from Mother Earth.
Under here you`ll find some images from my last autumn trip to the mountains of southern Norway, -it was a wonderful time with good memories of the encountered wildlife:
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Reindeer above the incoming fog layer.
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After sunset the colors turn bluish a little while before the night cover the scene..
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It is a great experience to have close contact with a reindeer herd. If the wind is very low, -they sometimes can come quite close to get the scent of what creature they are dealing with. This time a harmless photographer ! See the “Reindeer” gallery for more new reindeer images.
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The reindeer have been hunted in the mountains for thousands of years, -in fact since the end of the last ice age for app. 9000 years ago when mankind started to populate this land. For lets say a hundred years ago and all the way back to the ice age, this hunt was crucial for the existence of many of the people living here. People laid down a great deal of work trying to catch this magnificent source of food. Some places we can still find remnants of traps and stone constructions in connection with reindeer hunt.
This photo from Hardangervidda (north Europes biggest mountain plateau) show a 1000 years old pitfall trap with stone fences for leading the reindeer to the trap that then was covered with moss and heather (on top of a frame of thin branches).
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In the Rondane mountain range there exist a huge ancient stone trap for collecting up to 15-20 reindeer at the same time/same herd when they are scared up to this mountain top by the early hunters. Only a few of these traps are left in he Norwegian mountains. The “Archaeological Sites” Gallery contains more new images, -take a look if you have the time !

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Arctic fox in the Dovrefjell mountains. The winter is soon coming and the fox are close to have changed to its white winter fur. This year quite a number of arctic foxes had succesful denning in Norway, -this in contrast to 2012 when there was only 1 successful denning. The main reasons for successful denning or not is the amount of presence rodents.
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Just before sunrise.
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Arctic fox profile in late evening light. See the “Arctic Fox” Gallery for more images.
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Siberian Jays inhabits the woods below the treeline. This bird is also called “The lumberjacks best friend” due to that they are extremely trustful by nature, -and was of this reason often hand-fed by loggers at their meal breaks.

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Another interesting bird that this year is especially numerous are the crossbills.

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A visit to the indigenious Nenet People on the Russian Yamal Peninsula and in the mountains of the Polar

Urals, April-2013.
After returning home from a trip to western Siberia I would like to share some images with those who are interested in indigenous people.
Today you can literally not find any arctic people that are not influenced by modern civilization. Well, this can perhaps be valid for all people on earth, -except for some extremely remote tribes in certain tropic jungle areas.
The Nenets, that I visited from early April and show a selection images of here, are characterized as the most traditional living people on the northern hemisphere. They are reindeer herders living in the old world from the Kanin Peninsula in the west to Taimyr in the east. They are true nomads that migrate together with their reindeer herds year round. What makes them unique and true as nomads is that their migration includes all parts of the family; children, wife and parents/grandparents. This is especially valid for the nenets of the Yamal Peninsula (“Yamal” means “The end of the world” in nenet language). An overview over their yearly migration cycle can be as follow: From January to mid March when the winter is as its coldest and the weather roughest they spend their time in the forest tundra in the Nadym region south of the Gulf of Ob. In these good reindeer feeding grounds they do not move camps very often, but stay behind and do work such as making new sledges, tools, necessary maintenance of equipment etc. Temperatures can also there easily drop to minus 50°C at this time of year, but it is far less windy than on the tundra further north. From mid March to beginning of June they migrate with first crossing the Gulf of Ob, for so continue migrating northwards on the huge Yamal Peninsula. Averagely they move camp every 2-3 days before reaching the Yuribei River halfway up the Peninsula. This big river must be crossed when the ice is still present, and they are therefore in a rush to reach there before the river ice breaks up. Grandparents and all winter equipment are left behind just before crossing the river. The Grandparents will stay at this place all Summer and support themselves mainly by fishing. With lighter equipment the younger generations head northwards with the reindeer herds. The sledges which are pulled by reindeer are used all year round and are now gliding on grass. The speed is slower, but goes remarkable smooth afterall. Making a huge circle up further north all Summer for finding good pasture land for the reindeers they are back again to the newly frozen up Yuribei in October month. They pick up their Grandparents and head south again on snow covered tundra towards the Gulf of Ob that is crossed in mid December. The migration circle is closed when putting up their Chums (tepee-like fur tents) /winter camp in the forest tundra of the Nadym region south of the gulf in early January.
Some of the Nenets, -those with the longest migration routes can travel up to 1000km northwards, and the same distance back south again later on the year.

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Caravan of migrating Nenets. The women runs the sledges with all the belongings while the men is herding the reindeer.

It was a very interesting trip to this rugged people of the north. To explore their way of living gave me an extra tad of realism since I ate the same food as them (reindeer and fish, -most raw…) and was dressed up in reindeer fur & footwear clothing just like them. A bit uncomfortable for photographing in these bulky clothes, but this was outweighed by a never freezing photographer !
My trip to Siberia also included a visit to the Nenets living in the Polar Ural mountains west of the Yamal Peninsula. The way to these people lead me first to the abandoned settlement of Polyarniy from where the former Soviet Union launched nuclear missiles to explode over the Novaya Zemlya test field. Thereafter I travelled up and deep into the mountains to a remote Nenet camp. In the Polar Urals these nomads rarely leave the mountains, and migrate together with their reindeer herds in a south-north direction year round.
Scroll down for a selection of images, -or have a look at he the “People of the Land” gallery HERE (starting with image PL-35) for more images of this amazing people !

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Travelling by reindeer sledge is the most common way of transport on the Yamal Peninsula.

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The Nenets still use their holy Sacrificial Places which are to be found all over the huge Yamal Peninsula.

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Part from Camp on the Yamal Peninsula.

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Young Nenet girl Ulya at the family camp call for her favorite Reindeer. Yamal Peninsula.

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Nenet man on the Yamal Peninsula. Bad weather is approaching, – a couple of hours later the storm arrived.

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Reindeer herd on the Yamal Peninsula.

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The Nenets on the Yamal Peninsula are held as the worlds best reindeer herders.

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Beside reindeer herding, the Nenets of the Yamal Peninsula also trap foxes, mainly for fur trading purposes. Two years ago it was mainly Arctic Foxes here, but now over 50% of the foxes are the Red Fox species.

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Sveta is about to skin an Arctic Fox (Nenetsk: Nokho).

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Part from inside the Chum (Nenetsk: Mya). Sveta is skinning a Red Fox (Nenetsk: Tyonya)

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Caravans of migrating Nenets and their reindeer herd. Averagely they migrate northwards every second day to be able to reach the big Yuribei River for crossing this in early June before the river ice breaks up.

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Well decorated Caravan lead reindeer.

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Maksim the Nenet.

As mentioned in the text above, -for more images from this trip, see the HERE (starting with image PL-35).

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WILDLIFE WINTER-REPORT FROM THE BORDER ZONE BETWEEN FINLAND AND RUSSIA, NOV/DEC-2012

After spending a week in “No Mans Land” between Finland and Russia you will below see some image-examples of wildlife I observed there that week. My photo target no.1 on this trip was Wolves. Photographing these elusive animals is easier said than done…, – winter time is difficult for these wildlife motives due to short days with limited light for photographing, low temperatures and wolves that use most of the time patrolling their huge territory. The first 5 days no wolves, -nor fresh tracks of them was seen. The days in the Taiga forest was exciting afterall, -there is always a chance of animals to show up, anywhere -anytime. The first winter cold showed up instead, with temperatures below -30 Deg.C. Such cold days make special noises in the forest; Loud “bangs”, – like hundreds, maybe thousand of rifle shot like sounds. Noises originated from contraction of trees.

The Wolves showed up on the 6th day. Four of them crossing the snow covered marsh ahead of me. – and suddenly they were gone. Just like nothing have happened…

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But one of the four Wolves turned and came my way…
See the “Wolf” gallery for more images.

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Once in a while a photographer can have luck getting these beautiful animals close up.
(due to the lack of new wolf photos from this trip I here publish 2 “new” photos taken in 2010)

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Quite focused, – must be someting edible.. (photo from 2010)

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Wolverine !

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Some White-tailed Eagles also spend the winter in the huge Taiga forest.
See the “White-tailed Eagle” gallery for more images.

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…and the same does the Golden Eagle. Here photographed a clear day showing the warm color from a sun that never
reach tree-top height at this proximity to the arctic circle.
See the “Golden Eagle” gallery for more images.

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AUTUMN IN THE NORWEGIAN MOUNTAINS, SEPT/OCT – 2012

Autumn in the Norwegian mountains means for many people recreation and Reindeer hunt. Southern Norway is the only country in Europe that still have wild Tundra Reindeer (Rangifer Tarandus) roaming in the mountains. Since the end of last ice age the Reindeers have been the most important mammal to hunt for Norwegians. Well, -it can be discussed how important Reindeer hunt is for modern household nowadays, -in fact as important as earlier, but more for recreation.

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In the Suldal mountains there is a special place that Reindeer Hunters have travelled to for thousands of years. Among numerous rocks here there is one big rock placed strategically between a mountain and a lake, -and have got the name “Skutesteinen”. The Reindeer have their path below the rock and the lake, and hunters have made a blind by the rock for hunting them. The blind is a pile/wall of stones stacked up on each other. Well, -it is only remnants of this blind left today. It was originally buildt no later than the Viking age. On the roof/wall of this “Skutestein” we can find 1000 year old carvings of Reindeer, Moose, Fox and other animals. And also the hunter himself, a Viking named Vivil have written with Runes several sentences such as ” I want to choose the most beautiful girl in the world”, and “Vivil the archer lived here”. May be it was Vivil that carved himself on the rock? -See the carving below here. On the image above you can see my friend Arnfinn Nilsen studying the Runes on “Skutesteinen”.

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Is this “Vivil the archer” ? The Viking ? For more images from this place, please see the “Archaeological Sites” gallery.

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Here is a 1000 year old example of the animals these hunters waited for at this special place.

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…and here they are in real.

Reindeer in the Norwegian Mountains. This is October, mating season, and fighting between bulls is rather common. These beautiful bulls walk in peace and have obviously found their place in the herds hierarchy.

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Reindeer herd in evening light. Go to the “Reindeer” gallery if you are interested to see more images of these majestic animals.

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The Red Listed (mainland Norway) Arctic Fox is to be found in certain areas of the Norwegian mountains. It is early October, and the foxes are soon finished developing their soft & warm winter fur. See the “Arctic Fox” gallery for more images of this beautiful animal !

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ICELAND JULY 2012 – A SHORT TRIP WITH GOOD FRIENDS

Here is a tiny selection of images from our week long trip to north east Iceland together with Odd & Ruth Gabrielsen.
I had been in the area a couple of years ago, and wanted to show them some of the best nature & wildlife Iceland can offer.

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Here we are (as usual minus the photographer…) walking in a 2500 year old lava field.

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The beaches on Iceland are vulcanic black. In nice contrast to the “always” sand-coloured beaches that is “normal” for us non-Icelandic residents…
See the “Landscape” gallery for more landscape images from Iceland.

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Here in the geothermal areas we can really smell and feel the interior of the planet we are living on.
Due to this closeness to Mother Earth`s ground materials, – it can be quite challenging taking a shower in the evening at the hotel when the water flashes off m3`s of stinking Sulphur gas…

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One of the most interesting bird species on Iceland is without doubt the Harlequin Duck. This is the eastern most
outskirt of its general distribution. The drakes as this are beautiful, and “all foreign birdwatchers” are looking for them. But they must be aware of that the drakes are away from their local territory by the end of June for spending the autumn and winter at sea.
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Another highly sought bird species is the exclusive Gyr Falcon. This falcon have for the last decades become rarer
in many countries, especially in the southern part of sub arctic. People that are so lucky to find an inhabited
Gyr territory must be extremely careful for not to scare the birds. Please do not publish any nest sites !
See the “Gyr Falcon” gallery for more images of this species.

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Iceland is also renown for whales and whaling. The whaling have now ended, and the whales are frequent
seen in the western and nortern fiords. Here a Humpback whale by the north coast.
We saw 6 Humpback Whales and 1 Minke Whale during a 3 hours boat trip.
More Whale images are to be seen in the “Whales” Gallery.
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Lake Myvatn and surroundings is the most known bird watching area on Iceland. Here a couple of Horned Grebes.
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Common Snipe on a clump of lava by the shore of Lake Myvatn, -the vulcano Hiidarfjall in the background. This Snipe is together with the Whimbrel, Golden Plover and Dunlin among the most common waders in the area. Since Iceland is placed in the middle of the New and the Old World, there are for sure many celebrities of bird species that shows up from time to time…
If you are interested in Waders, please take a look in the “Waders” Gallery.
END.

By the way: I was recently on a photographic trip to Ethiopia, not really arctic (!!), but quite an interesting place.
Take a look at the images here: Ethiopia !!

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Arctic Images website is now renewed & modernized with total new layout !!

I hope you will enjoy the site and also a selection of some new images from Norway during this summer:

Starting in southern Norway.
My brother Kjell Tysdal (Owl expert) reported about a photogenic Tawny Owl near his home in Aardal, Ryfylke. We both had some interesting evenings when we photographed this male owl using radio controlled cameras. Each evening the owl appeared in the opening of this ash tree when the light dimmed. This is his year around day-place. The exposure time was down to 2 seconds, but with a solid tripod in combination with the cameras mirror lock-up, the images became razor sharp. Of course depending on a static owl.

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Male Tawny Owl.

Further north; in Trondelag county:
The small and trusting Pygmy Owl nested in an old Great spotted Woodpecker hole near Levanger. The day-active owl had regular hunting trips in the near by area. When she flew out from the hole it was important to spot the owl and approach her carefully for watching & photographing. In one occasion she flew out, for shortly after to dive down to the ground for seconds later to turn up with this mouse.
See the “Pygmy Owl” gallery for more images !!
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Female Pygmy Owl.

It is an exclusive experience to be able to watch lekking Great Snipes. These leks are performed on elevated, slightly south-faced marshes during night time. The birds are so occupied with the lek that they do not hold the normal shyness for people. This actual lek contained up to 20 snipes that for hours perfomed this peculiar play with territoriel markings and intensive noises that sounds like rolling “Ping-Pong balls”.
If you are interested to see more images of the Great Snipes in lek, please see the “Waders” gallery.

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Male Great Snipe in lek.

And finally to the top of Norway, Varanger Peninsula:
The northern part is in fact real arctic, with its animal & bird species, and also humans living in close relations with the land here.
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Drying of fish (mainly Cod) are on many places still done by the traditional method.

Not far away, over at the Russian side of the border we see one of the worlds most polluting cities; Nikel. Luckily for Norway, -the most frequent wind direction are from west to east. Last year, when I was over at the Russian side of the border I could with own eyes see that tens & tens of kilometers eastwards consists of desert-looking landscape were all vegetation are dead. The average age of the people are significant lower than the rest of Russia.

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Nikel seen from the Norwegian/Russian border.

Varanger Peninsula is extremely rich of remnants of from its Sami cultural history.
This Offer stone Ring dates at least 1000 years back. On the upper left side you can see the holy Bear Stone (Guovzageadgi) that was the supposed reason for placing the holy Offer Ring here.
If you are interested to see more af the archaeological sites in the Varanger area, please see the “Archaeological sites” gallery.

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Holy Sami Offer Ring at the Varanger Peninsula.

Varanger is a heaven for Ruffs. While the Ruffs are declining in both southern and middle Norway, the Ruffs are thriving up here in the arctic landscape. Countless leks are to be found here. To watch lekking Ruffs is really exciting. Take a look in the “Waders” gallery for more Ruff images.

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Male Ruffs in lek.

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Arctic Redpoll.

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Male Bluethroat.

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Red-throated Pipit.

Southwards again to Finnish Lapland:
The sub-arctic Spotted Redshank are on many birders wishlist. But they are not common to see in summer time, -and rather difficult to find at their nesting grounds. This summer I found two pairs nesting in northern Finland. Why are they black ? This have been discussed in several scientific forums….

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Male Spotted Redshank.

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SVALBARD MARCH – 2011.

The travel to Svalbard was this time done together with my son Mats and Mattis. What a great time we had !

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Lunch at the Tunabreen glacier front..

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Stranded icebergs can sometime act as reflecting prisms. See the “Ice & Snow” gallery for more new images.

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Prior to an incoming low pressure weather system we saw the phenomenon “Parhelia”. This is described with great interest by the early arctic explorers

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On our journey in the arctic wilderness we also met Polar Bears. See the “Polar Bear” gallery for more images.

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This big male bear is wandering unaffected on the sea ice. They are really the King of the arctic !

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The Dwarf Reindeers have no real enemies on Svalbard, so they are not afraid of humans. See the “Dwarf Reindeer” gallery for more images.

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We also made a visit to one of the few active fur trappers on Svalbard. Harald Solheim on Kapp Wijk have lived and trapped here since 1978.

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What a beautiful creature we met on our journey. Can we call it “Ice Bear”?

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